Giorgos Bourogiannis

Principal Researcher

Archaeologist


Dr Giorgos Bourogiannis is the Principal Researcher of the CyCoMed project. He is an archaeologist of Early Iron Age specialism, with a special interest in the contacts between the Aegean and the eastern Mediterranean.
Short CV
Giorgos Bourogiannis was born in Athens in 1976. He studied archaeology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and obtained his MSc by Research at the University of Edinburgh, under the supervision of Professor Irene Lemos. He returned to Athens for his PhD, which he completed in 2007, under the supervision of Professor Nota Kourou. The title of his PhD thesis was ‘Phoenician and Cypriot pottery in the Early Iron Age Aegen: Trade networks and the problem of Black-on-Red ware. He carried out part of his doctoral research as a fellow at the universities of Cyprus, of Naples ‘L’Orientale’ and of Rome ‘La Sapienza’, where he was tutored on Phoenician language and epigraphy by Professor Maria Giulia Amadasi Guzzo. He has served as an archaeologist at the Archaeological Institute of Aegean Studies in Rhodes and as a curator at the British Museum – Department of Greece and Rome in London. Moreover, he has worked as the A.G. Leventis Foundation postdoctoral researcher at the Museum of Mediterranean and Near Eastern Antiquities (Medelhavsmuseet) in Stockholm, studying the sanctuary of Ayia Irini on Cyprus, and as a postdoctoral research associate at the National Hellenic Research Foundation – Institute of Historical Research in Athens, where he worked on the research project ‘The Silver Coinage of the kings of Cyprus: Numismatics and History of the Archaic and Classical Periods (6 th – 4 th century BC), acronym SilCoinCy, under the direction of Dr Evangeline Markou. In 2019 he was a postdoctoral visiting fellow at the University of Cambridge, where he focused on the Cypro-Minoan and Cypro-Syllabic scripts, under the supervision of Dr Philippa Mary Steele.
Giorgos Bourogiannis has taught archaeology courses at the University of Athens – Plato Academy educational programs, at the Hellenic Open University and at the postgraduate course on the archaeology of the Eastern Mediterrenean of the University of the Aegean in Rhodes. He has taken part in numerous excavation projects at Xombourgo-Tenos, Kardamaina-Kos, Epidaurus, Lefkandi-Euboea, Heraion-Samos, Kyme-Italy, Palaipaphos-Cyprus, Kharayeb-Lebanon and Naukratis in Egypt. He has presented papers at numerous international conferences in Greece and abroad, and has an extensive publication record of scientific articles, books and conference proceedings. In 2015 he organized in Stockholm the international Cyprological conference ‘Ancient Cyprus today: Museum collection and new research’, that was published one year later. Furthermore, on 8–11 December 2020 he organized the international digital conference ‘Beyond Cyprus: Investigating Cypriot Connectivity in the Mediterranean from the Late Bronze Age to the end of the Classical period’. His research interests embrace the contacts between the Aegean and the eastern Mediterranean, the archaeology of Cyprus and the Levant, the use of writing and writing systems in the Early Iron Age Aegean, Phoenician language and epigraphy, the archaeological visibility of Cypriot activity and possibly presence overseas, sanctuaries and cult, as well as issues of trade networks in the eastern Mediterranean with emphasis on the role played by the Cypriots. Since 2018, he is the principal investigator of the ‘Cypriot Connectivity in the Mediterranean from the Late Bronze Age to the end of the Classical Period’ research project, acronym CyCoMed, that is funded by the Hellenic Foundation for Research and Innovation – General Secretariat for Research and Innovation. The project is being implemented at the National Hellenic Research Foundation – Institute of Historical Research, in collaboration with the University of Cambidge, Faculty of Classics.

Dr Evangeline Markou

Reasearch Team

Νumismatist


On behalf of the hosting institution, the CyCoMed research team is enhanced by the participation of Dr Evangeline Markou, numismatist, and senior researcher at the Institute of Historical Research. Dr Markou generously provides academic guidance on the typology, historic framework and geographic distribution of then ancient Cypriot coinage. In 2014–2015, Dr Markou was the principal investigator of the research project ‘The silver coinage of the kings of Cyprus: numismatics and history of the archaic and classical period (acronym SilCoinCy). The creation of the website Kyprios Character was an important aspect of that project and is being updated to this day.
Short CV
Evangeline Markou is a Senior Researcher at the Institute of Historical Research (IHR), Section of Greek and Roman Antiquity (SGRA) of the National Hellenic Research Foundation (NHRF). Her research focuses on the history and numismatics of Archaic, Classical and early Hellenistic Cyprus; it has been presented in scientific congresses in Greece and abroad and was published in two books and in more than 30 papers in scientific journals, collective volumes and congress proceedings. E. Markou studied History and Archaeology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (1993-1997) and obtained her M.Phil (2001) and Ph.D. in History and Civilisation of the Antiquity (2006) from the University Sorbonne - Paris IV with a postgraduate fellowship from the A.G. Leventis Foundation. She worked at the Fitzwilliam Museum of Cambridge (2004-2005) and at the Numismatic Museum of Athens (2005-2007) as responsible for the documentation and digitalisation of numismatic collections. She taught and coordinated Undergraduate and Postgraduate courses on Ancient Numismatics, Ancient History, and History of Cyprus in the University of Cyprus (2008-2009), in the Open University of Cyprus (2008-2012 ; 2014-2016), in the University of the Aegean (2014-2018) and in the Hellenic Open University (2017-2020). Since 1997, E. Markou participated in 11 funded research projects in Greece and abroad as a research collaborator. In the years 2014-2015 she was the scientific coordinator of the research project: “The Silver Coinage of the Kings of Cyprus: Numismatics and History in the Archaic and Classical Periods (6th to 4th centuries BC)” (acronym SilCoinCy)” funded by the Action ARISTEIA II. In the framework of this project was conceived, realised and created the Kyprios Character website, dedicated to the history archaeology and numismatics of ancient Cyprus (http://kyprioscharacter.eie.gr/en/), that is constantly updated until today.
 

Charalampos Paraskeva

Reasearch Team

Archaeologist


Dr Charalampos Paraskeva was responsible for the creation and functionality of the project’s database.
Short CV

Dr. Charalambos Paraskeva is an archaeologist specialising in the prehistoric archaeology of Cyprus, who also has extensive experience in digital humanities. He holds a degree in History and Archaeology (2004-2008) from the University of Cyprus, an MSc in Mediterranean Archaeology (2008-2010), and a PhD in Archaeology (2010-2015) from the University of Edinburgh, while as part of his commitment to lifelong learning he has completed from 2014 until now 79 MOOC courses on various topics (artificial intelligence, programming, spatial analysis, statistics, pedagogy, graphic design, photogrammetry). In the past he worked as an external associate at the Cyprus Food and Nutrition Museum (2014-2016), as a special scientist (2016), postdoctoral researcher (2016-2019), and research associate (2019-2020) at the University of Cyprus, and as a research associate ( 2018-2019) at the Hellenic Foundation for Research and Innovation, while now he is working as a special scientist (2020-2021) at the University of Cyprus, as a specialist in artefacts digitization (2019-2021) at the Holy Archbishopric of Cyprus, and as a postdoctoral fellow at the Cyprus-American Archaeological Research Institute (2021-2022). He has collaborated to date with a number of research projects (ARCANE-RG3, CARMA, CP, SL, SeSaLaC, CyCoMed, UnSaLa-CY, RURAL-CY, ReCult), participated in several excavation projects (Palaepaphos Urban Landscape Project, Prastio- Archaeological Excavation, Erimi-Pamboula excavations, Souskiou Project, Kissonerga-Skalia Excavation, Elaborating Early Neolithic Cyprus, Geroskipou-Agioi Pente Excavations, Paphos Theatre Archaeological Project) and surface surveys (Settled and Sacred Landscapes of Cyprus, Lophou Archaeological); while to date, he has edited a volume, published 17 studies in peer-reviewed scientific journals and volumes, developed 7 archaeological software packages, and gave 25 presentations at conferences and workshops or as invited solo lectures.

His research interests include prehistoric archaeology (small-scale societies, sociocultural change, trade and exchange, social complexity), methods and techniques in archaeology (pottery typology, survey and excavation methods), digital humanities (databases in archaeology, statistical methods in archaeology, 2D and 3D digitisation), landscape archaeology (GIS analyses, landscape studies, survey), and theoretical archaeology (materialism, assemblage theory, complexity theory). Beyond academic research, he is a technology aficionado, a mathematics enthusiast, a self-taught programmer, and an amateur digital graphics artist and photographer.

 
 

Angelos Papadopoulos

Reasearch Team

Archaeologist


Dr Angelos Papadopoulos thoroughly studied the Late Bronze Age data from carefully-selected sites in the Aegean and the eastern Mediterranean.
Short CV
Angelos Papadopoulos was born in Athens and studied archaeology at Bournemouth University and University College London. After obtaining his doctorate on the Iconography of Warfare in the Bronze Age Aegean from the University of Liverpool, he worked in Cyprus at the Department of Antiquities, where he developed an interest in the interconnections between the Aegean, Cyprus and the Levant in the 2nd millennium BCE. His publications focus on aspects of prehistoric iconography, warfare, trade and exchange, while he has presented his work in various international conferences in Europe and the USA. Angelos is a faculty member at College Year in Athens, where he teaches archaeology of prehistoric Greece, ancient technology and Mediterranean interconnections in the Bronze Age. In 2019, he was a postdoctoral collaborator of CyCoMed and focused on the physical presence of the Cypriot merchant, outside the island of Cyprus during the Late Bronze Age. His current projects include the study and publication of a prehistoric cemetery at Kissonerga-Ammoudia in Cyprus, a new corpus of wall paintings from Mycenaean Thebes and an assemblage of Cypriot and Mycenaean pottery from Tell el-Hesi, Israel.
 

Vanessa Pappa

Reasearch Team

Archaeologist


Mrs Vanessa Pappa works primarily on the Iron Age database.
Short CV
Vanessa Pappa was born in Athens and studied for her BA IN Archaeology and Arts at the School of Philosophy in University of Ioannina. In 2018 she completed her postgratuaded studies at the department of Mediterranean studies in the University of the Aegean obtaining an MA in the “Archaeology of Eastern Mediterranean from Prehistoric time until Late antiquity: Greece, Egypt, Near East”, with a special focus on the Late Bronze Age iconography of the Aegean. In her dissertation entitled “The iconography of the chariot in the Aegean Late Bronze Age: use and symbolism”, the pictorial representation of the chariot in the Aegean was studied within each wider eastern Mediterranean context. She was worked as a filed archaeologist in the rescue excavation of the Neolithic settlement at Amyntaio (2012-2014) under the Florina Ephorate of antiquities. V. Pappa has been involved in research of the University of Ioannina as part of the Byzantine archaeology courses aiming at recording the byzantine icons of the churches at Lefkada. Furthermore, she was a member of the 2019 excavation team at the Palace of Nestor (Pylos, Messenia) under the supervision of Prof. J. Davis and Dr. S. Stocker (University of Cincinnati, USA). V. Pappa has participated at the student conference Mare Nostrum (University of Rhodes, 2017) with her paper “The crisis of the 12th century BCE through the iconography of the Aegean chariot”. In 2018 she presented her poster presentation “Aegean Iconography “, at the International Conference No (e)scape, University of Heidelberg. Her research interests focus on the trade networks and iconography of the Late Bronze Age Aegean as well as of the wider Eastern Mediterranean and especially Cyprus, Egypt, Levantine coast and Hittites.

Philippa Mary Steele

Advisor

Linguistic history


On behalf of the secondment institution, the CyCoMed research team has the honour to comprise Dr Philippa Mary Steele, senior researcher at the University of Cambridge – Faculty of Classics, and supervisor of the ‘Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems – acronym Crews’ project. Dr Steele, who is an expert on the linguistic history of ancient Cyprus, provides academic guidance on ancient Cypriot scripts and epigraphy.
Short CV
Dr Philippa M. Steele is a Senior Research Associate at the Faculty of Classics, and Senior Research Fellow at Magdalene College, at the University of Cambridge. She is the Principal Investigator on a five-year ERC-funded project, Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems (CREWS), directing a research team focused on the writing systems of the Aegean, eastern Mediterranean and Levant in the 2nd and 1st millennia BC. You can visit the CREWS website here for further information: https://crewsproject.wordpress.com/ The CREWS project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 677758). Dr Steele has wide ranging interests in the languages and writing systems of the Bronze Age Aegean and eastern Mediterranean, with a particular focus in her earlier research on ancient Cyprus. This research resulted in her ‘Cypriot trilogy’ (A Linguistic History of Ancient Cyprus, Syllabic Writing on Cyprus and its Context and Writing and Society in Ancient Cyprus), and she has published widely on Cypriot languages and writing, the Aegean linear scripts and their administrative contexts and the development of the early Greek alphabets. Her role in the CyCoMed project is to act as an advisor and as a supervisor for Dr Bourogiannis’s research visits in Cambridge, with particular attention to Cypriot epigraphy attested outside of Cyprus.